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Sony NEX-VG10 HD camcorder preview

Well, that was quick. Right after yesterday’s surprising announcement, Sony flew its yet-to-be-released NEX-VG10 camcorder into London just in time for today’s showcase event. Naturally, we had to get our hands on this shiny baby, and boy we were impressed. In case you missed the news, this snazzy Handycam’s the world’s first HD camcorder with interchangeable lens, meaning you can share E-mount lenses with your young NEX DSLRs, or take advantage of the abundant A-mount lenses with the help of an adapter. Likewise, there are also hot and cold shoe mounts on the mic shaft to cater your current camera accessories. Read on for our thoughts on the rest of the camcorder — we’ve put together a little sample clip for you at the end as well.

Sony NEX-VG10 HD camcorder preview

There isn’t much to complain about with this $2,000 (and, sadly, possibly £2,000 for the Brits) piece of kit in terms of appearance and ergonomics. We like being able to hold it by either the seemingly solid body (using the strap) or the mic shaft, and both ways provided comfortable grip without much fatigue due to the light weight (even with the bundled lens). We were also able to quickly master the jog-dial control next to the 3-inch screen, but for this price, we expected a touchscreen interface as well to make life easier. As for the bundled F3.5-6.3 18-200mm lens, we found that zooming required a bit more effort than we liked, so thankfully there’s auto focus mode — just like anyway ordinary camcorder — to save us from further wrist work with the focus ring. We must also point out that unlike the Olympus PEN, this Sony camcorder didn’t pick up any mechanical noise from its lens auto focussing; otherwise, this kit totally wouldn’t deserve such price tag.

Of course, what we really care about is the picture and sound quality. All is revealed in our sample reel below (remember to enable HD playback mode), but in brief: stunningly accurate colors, sharp 1080/60i picture, and impressive audio sensitivity (notice how the mic was able to pick up conversations from afar; you can also enable just the front mics to minimise background noise). You may notice some shakiness while we were adjusting the lens — we’ll blame it on our lack of practice from the little hands-on time we had. Regardless, the NEX-VG10 certainly lived up to our expectation, and we look forward to hear what the filming hobbyists think of this prosumer-level camcorder when it comes out in September.

 

[via Engadget]

July 16, 2010 Posted by | Gadget Preview, Sony | Leave a comment

Sony NEX-VG10 HD camcorder preview

Well, that was quick. Right after yesterday’s surprising announcement, Sony flew its yet-to-be-released NEX-VG10 camcorder into London just in time for today’s showcase event. Naturally, we had to get our hands on this shiny baby, and boy we were impressed. In case you missed the news, this snazzy Handycam’s the world’s first HD camcorder with interchangeable lens, meaning you can share E-mount lenses with your young NEX DSLRs, or take advantage of the abundant A-mount lenses with the help of an adapter. Likewise, there are also hot and cold shoe mounts on the mic shaft to cater your current camera accessories. Read on for our thoughts on the rest of the camcorder — we’ve put together a little sample clip for you at the end as well.

Sony NEX-VG10 HD camcorder preview

There isn’t much to complain about with this $2,000 (and, sadly, possibly £2,000 for the Brits) piece of kit in terms of appearance and ergonomics. We like being able to hold it by either the seemingly solid body (using the strap) or the mic shaft, and both ways provided comfortable grip without much fatigue due to the light weight (even with the bundled lens). We were also able to quickly master the jog-dial control next to the 3-inch screen, but for this price, we expected a touchscreen interface as well to make life easier. As for the bundled F3.5-6.3 18-200mm lens, we found that zooming required a bit more effort than we liked, so thankfully there’s auto focus mode — just like anyway ordinary camcorder — to save us from further wrist work with the focus ring. We must also point out that unlike the Olympus PEN, this Sony camcorder didn’t pick up any mechanical noise from its lens auto focussing; otherwise, this kit totally wouldn’t deserve such price tag.

Of course, what we really care about is the picture and sound quality. All is revealed in our sample reel below (remember to enable HD playback mode), but in brief: stunningly accurate colors, sharp 1080/60i picture, and impressive audio sensitivity (notice how the mic was able to pick up conversations from afar; you can also enable just the front mics to minimise background noise). You may notice some shakiness while we were adjusting the lens — we’ll blame it on our lack of practice from the little hands-on time we had. Regardless, the NEX-VG10 certainly lived up to our expectation, and we look forward to hear what the filming hobbyists think of this prosumer-level camcorder when it comes out in September.

 

[via Engadget]

July 16, 2010 Posted by | Gadget Preview, Sony | Leave a comment

New Camcorder from Sony, Sexy NEX-VG10


Dang! Look at this camcorder, I never thought I would attribute the word “sexy” to a camcorder, but technological semantics would be the right choice in this case. And I thought my old gen network camcorder (yea, it has bluetooth and can connect to the Internet) DCR-IP220 was a looker.

From NEXlens

We have heard of interchangeable lens cameras in its NEX line up (I believe the first camera to sport the interchangeable lens would be my Sony Qualia 016 model) and now Sony pushed this idea into camcorder realm and hooked up this little guy to be compatible with Sony’s already established G Lens and Carl Zeiss® collection. Sony also packed bigger and better sensor into it. The NEX-VG10 has the same sensor format that Sony builds into the full-sized α DSLRs. With 19.5 times the surface area of conventional camcorders, the large Exmor™ APS HD CMOS sensor makes capturing cinematic video with a shallow depth of field a breeze.

From NEXlens

It can also shoot great pictures with its BIONZ® image processor and 14MP to start with. That processor provides Data Noise Reduction, Faster Image processing, and Data compression enabling high quality 24Mbps video recording. It also boasts a superb audio recording as well. High quality video requires high quality audio. The Quad Capsule Spatial Array stereo microphone contains four precision placed microphone capsules to provide exceptional front-side directivity and stereo separation.

For more nitty-gritty news and details hit this press release and also check out a better representation of its features at SonyStyle pre-sale page.

I think it is going to be my next camcorder and the Sony CX12 will go into retirement center.

New Camcorder from Sony, Sexy NEX-VG10

[via SonyInsider]

July 15, 2010 Posted by | News, Sony | Leave a comment

New Camcorder from Sony, Sexy NEX-VG10


Dang! Look at this camcorder, I never thought I would attribute the word “sexy” to a camcorder, but technological semantics would be the right choice in this case. And I thought my old gen network camcorder (yea, it has bluetooth and can connect to the Internet) DCR-IP220 was a looker.

From NEXlens

We have heard of interchangeable lens cameras in its NEX line up (I believe the first camera to sport the interchangeable lens would be my Sony Qualia 016 model) and now Sony pushed this idea into camcorder realm and hooked up this little guy to be compatible with Sony’s already established G Lens and Carl Zeiss® collection. Sony also packed bigger and better sensor into it. The NEX-VG10 has the same sensor format that Sony builds into the full-sized α DSLRs. With 19.5 times the surface area of conventional camcorders, the large Exmor™ APS HD CMOS sensor makes capturing cinematic video with a shallow depth of field a breeze.

From NEXlens

It can also shoot great pictures with its BIONZ® image processor and 14MP to start with. That processor provides Data Noise Reduction, Faster Image processing, and Data compression enabling high quality 24Mbps video recording. It also boasts a superb audio recording as well. High quality video requires high quality audio. The Quad Capsule Spatial Array stereo microphone contains four precision placed microphone capsules to provide exceptional front-side directivity and stereo separation.

For more nitty-gritty news and details hit this press release and also check out a better representation of its features at SonyStyle pre-sale page.

I think it is going to be my next camcorder and the Sony CX12 will go into retirement center.

New Camcorder from Sony, Sexy NEX-VG10

[via SonyInsider]

July 15, 2010 Posted by | News, Sony | Leave a comment

Sony Vaio P Is A Worthy Upgrade With Accelerometer, Touchpads and GPS [Sony]

Sony Vaio P Is A Worthy Upgrade With Accelerometer, Touchpads and GPS

Well, well, well. If it isn’t another attempt by Sony at that ill-conceived “not a netbook, it’s an ultraportable!” market. After rumors, they’ve done good: inbuilt GPS, inbuilt 3G and an accelerometer. Plus, strange optical touchpads either side of the LCD.

Those touchpads allow for greater control of the ultraportable, with the previous Vaio P controlled just by the mouse nib within the keypad—proving very clumsy. Located either side of the LCD screen (an 8-incher with 1600 x 768 resolution), they act as mouse buttons and both can be used the same time, for a strange, almost DS-like hold.

Internally, it runs on an Atom Z540 chip, loading Windows 7—there’s no word of Sony’s Linux-based X-Media Bar UI being supported in this latest model. Just as well, as we found in our review that “some of the visual design and nuanced functionality are lacking to the point where you’d rather just launch Vista.”

2GB of DDR2 SDRAM and a 64GB SSD run with the Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 500, and it’s got a nice selection of added features—an accelerometer which Sony says can control documents or photos with a simple “flick,” and it can change documents from landscape to portrait mode.

802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 2.1, stereo speakers with mic, a Motion Eye camera, 2 USB ports and Everywair embedded 3G round the Vaio P off nicely, which weighs 632 grams and has a battery life of up to 10 hours with the additional battery being sold, otherwise just five hours.

Really, I’m surprised. After Sony made a bit of a fool of itself with the original model, this Vaio P Mk II almost makes up for it. Not to mention the five colors it now comes in—orange, green, pink, black and white. On sale June. [Sony]

It’s smaller than a notebook and smarter than a smartphone: the colourful VAIO P Series from Sony is your perfect partner for on-the-move computing.

Weighing just over 600g and slipping effortlessly into a bag or jacket pocket, new VAIO P Series gives you all the power of a fully-featured Windows® computing experience… and so much more.

Ideal for busy people who can’t sit still, it’s the first VAIO designed for simple operation if you’re standing or walking. The central trackball is complemented by an additional touchpad and mouse buttons. Duplicating the main controls, they’re located at either edge of the screen for comfortable operation with both thumbs while you’re holding the computer in two hands.

VAIO P Series is the first notebook computer from Sony with built-in GPS and a new Digital Compass. Perfect for telling you where you are and what’s happening around you, they can help you find your hotel or a nearby restaurant if you’re standing on the street corner in an unfamiliar city1.

A brand-new VAIO Location Search software offers a real-time map view without tying up your web browser. Your map position and orientation are displayed along with nearby Points of Interest and even local weather conditions.

The ultra-light notebook’s ‘on-the-go’ credentials for travellers are boosted with Everywair 3G on-board, giving high-speed connectivity to mobile networks (where available).

New VAIO P is the first notebook from Sony with a built-in accelerometer that responds to physical movements. Just give VAIO a gentle shake to ‘flick’ through pictures or the pages of a PDF document, or navigate back and forth through your web browsing history.

The sensor also recognises when VAIO P Series is turned on its side, automatically ‘flipping’ the screen for easy reading of documents or web pages in portrait mode. The notebook’s additional mouse buttons are perfectly placed for comfortable page-turning when you’re reading in portrait position – just like a paperback book or magazine.

New VAIO P Series is beautifully designed for easy operation, with a comfortable full-pitch keyboard for easy typing, plus a bright, extra-wide VAIO Display Plus that’s ideally proportioned for viewing movies or two web pages side-by-side. There’s also an ambient light sensor that dims screen illumination for comfortable viewing while saving power.

For extra convenience, dedicated buttons are provided for Quick Web Access and one-touch access to VAIO Care. There’s also a handy new Change Resolution button: instantly select a larger font size for easy on-screen reading, or choose maximum detail for HD movie viewing.

Available in five vibrant colours (black, white, pink, green and orange), the new VAIO P Series is complemented by a choice of stylish accessories that includes a distinctively perforated silicone slip case and carry strap.

The new VAIO P Series ultra-portable notebook computer is available from June 2010.

May 10, 2010 Posted by | News, Sony | Leave a comment

Sony Vaio P Is A Worthy Upgrade With Accelerometer, Touchpads and GPS [Sony]

Sony Vaio P Is A Worthy Upgrade With Accelerometer, Touchpads and GPS

Well, well, well. If it isn’t another attempt by Sony at that ill-conceived "not a netbook, it’s an ultraportable!" market. After rumors, they’ve done good: inbuilt GPS, inbuilt 3G and an accelerometer. Plus, strange optical touchpads either side of the LCD.

Those touchpads allow for greater control of the ultraportable, with the previous Vaio P controlled just by the mouse nib within the keypad—proving very clumsy. Located either side of the LCD screen (an 8-incher with 1600 x 768 resolution), they act as mouse buttons and both can be used the same time, for a strange, almost DS-like hold.

Internally, it runs on an Atom Z540 chip, loading Windows 7—there’s no word of Sony’s Linux-based X-Media Bar UI being supported in this latest model. Just as well, as we found in our review that "some of the visual design and nuanced functionality are lacking to the point where you’d rather just launch Vista."

2GB of DDR2 SDRAM and a 64GB SSD run with the Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 500, and it’s got a nice selection of added features—an accelerometer which Sony says can control documents or photos with a simple "flick," and it can change documents from landscape to portrait mode.

802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 2.1, stereo speakers with mic, a Motion Eye camera, 2 USB ports and Everywair embedded 3G round the Vaio P off nicely, which weighs 632 grams and has a battery life of up to 10 hours with the additional battery being sold, otherwise just five hours.

Really, I’m surprised. After Sony made a bit of a fool of itself with the original model, this Vaio P Mk II almost makes up for it. Not to mention the five colors it now comes in—orange, green, pink, black and white. On sale June. [Sony]

It’s smaller than a notebook and smarter than a smartphone: the colourful VAIO P Series from Sony is your perfect partner for on-the-move computing.

Weighing just over 600g and slipping effortlessly into a bag or jacket pocket, new VAIO P Series gives you all the power of a fully-featured Windows® computing experience… and so much more.

Ideal for busy people who can’t sit still, it’s the first VAIO designed for simple operation if you’re standing or walking. The central trackball is complemented by an additional touchpad and mouse buttons. Duplicating the main controls, they’re located at either edge of the screen for comfortable operation with both thumbs while you’re holding the computer in two hands.

VAIO P Series is the first notebook computer from Sony with built-in GPS and a new Digital Compass. Perfect for telling you where you are and what’s happening around you, they can help you find your hotel or a nearby restaurant if you’re standing on the street corner in an unfamiliar city1.

A brand-new VAIO Location Search software offers a real-time map view without tying up your web browser. Your map position and orientation are displayed along with nearby Points of Interest and even local weather conditions.

The ultra-light notebook’s ‘on-the-go’ credentials for travellers are boosted with Everywair 3G on-board, giving high-speed connectivity to mobile networks (where available).

New VAIO P is the first notebook from Sony with a built-in accelerometer that responds to physical movements. Just give VAIO a gentle shake to ‘flick’ through pictures or the pages of a PDF document, or navigate back and forth through your web browsing history.

The sensor also recognises when VAIO P Series is turned on its side, automatically ‘flipping’ the screen for easy reading of documents or web pages in portrait mode. The notebook’s additional mouse buttons are perfectly placed for comfortable page-turning when you’re reading in portrait position – just like a paperback book or magazine.

New VAIO P Series is beautifully designed for easy operation, with a comfortable full-pitch keyboard for easy typing, plus a bright, extra-wide VAIO Display Plus that’s ideally proportioned for viewing movies or two web pages side-by-side. There’s also an ambient light sensor that dims screen illumination for comfortable viewing while saving power.

For extra convenience, dedicated buttons are provided for Quick Web Access and one-touch access to VAIO Care. There’s also a handy new Change Resolution button: instantly select a larger font size for easy on-screen reading, or choose maximum detail for HD movie viewing.

Available in five vibrant colours (black, white, pink, green and orange), the new VAIO P Series is complemented by a choice of stylish accessories that includes a distinctively perforated silicone slip case and carry strap.

The new VAIO P Series ultra-portable notebook computer is available from June 2010.

May 10, 2010 Posted by | News, Sony | Leave a comment

Sony announces ‘division two’ series of VAIO laptops built by other manufacturers

Sony announces ‘division two’ series of VAIO laptops built by other manufacturers
Well, here’s a bit of a surprise. In an interview with PC Pro, the deputy president of Sony’s VAIO Business Group, Ryosuke Akahane, has revealed that the company will soon be effectively splitting its laptop business into two distinct groups. The first, called “division one,” will continue with laptops designed and built by Sony as before, but the second, or “division two,” will rely on laptops built by other manufacturers. Those behind-the-scenes changes may not be readily apparent to consumers, however, as the so-called division two laptops will still carry the VAIO name, and will apparently have the same “taste of VAIO” and “style of VAIO,” with Sony naturally first approving all third-party designs. Presumably, this will also lead to some less expensive VAIO laptops, although Akahane was quick to point out that it’s not following the Dell model with different brands at different price points, saying instead that a new brand is “not efficient,” and that it wants to “enhance the identity of VAIO more and more.”

sourcePC Pro

April 16, 2010 Posted by | News, Sony | Leave a comment

Sony announces ‘division two’ series of VAIO laptops built by other manufacturers

Sony announces ‘division two’ series of VAIO laptops built by other manufacturers
Well, here’s a bit of a surprise. In an interview with PC Pro, the deputy president of Sony’s VAIO Business Group, Ryosuke Akahane, has revealed that the company will soon be effectively splitting its laptop business into two distinct groups. The first, called “division one,” will continue with laptops designed and built by Sony as before, but the second, or “division two,” will rely on laptops built by other manufacturers. Those behind-the-scenes changes may not be readily apparent to consumers, however, as the so-called division two laptops will still carry the VAIO name, and will apparently have the same “taste of VAIO” and “style of VAIO,” with Sony naturally first approving all third-party designs. Presumably, this will also lead to some less expensive VAIO laptops, although Akahane was quick to point out that it’s not following the Dell model with different brands at different price points, saying instead that a new brand is “not efficient,” and that it wants to “enhance the identity of VAIO more and more.”

sourcePC Pro

April 16, 2010 Posted by | News, Sony | Leave a comment

   

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