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Share Free iOS & MacOS apps and accessories.

Adobe Muse 0.8.653 ~ This is WYSWYG website design for All platform, IT’S FREE, TRY IT

Adobe Muse (codename) enables designers to create websites as easily as creating a layout for print. Design and publish original HTML pages using the latest web standards, and without writing code. Now in beta, Muse makes it a snap to produce unique, professional-looking websites.

Key Features of Muse:

  • Plan your project- Easy-to-use sitemaps, master pages, and a host of flexible, site-wide tools make it fast and intuitive to get your site planned out and ready for design.
  • Design your pages – Combine imagery, graphics and text with complete control, flexibility and power (almost as if you were using Adobe InDesign).
  • Add interactivity – Drag and drop fully customizable widgets like navigation menus and slide shows, embed HTML code snippets to include things like Google Maps, enable tool tips, rollovers and much more.
  • Publish your site – Preview your site with Muse to see how it looks and test how it works. Then convert to a live website using Adobe for hosting, or export the HTML for hosting with a provider of your choice.

Version 0.8.653:

  • Muse (code name) will be complimentary during the public beta period. Version 1 of Muse will be released in early 2012 at which time customers will need to purchase the application if they want to continue authoring websites with Muse.
  • Mac OS X 10.6 or later
  • Adobe AIR 2.7 or later

Download Now<

August 17, 2011 Posted by | Applications, Free apps, Mac OS, Microsoft Windows, Softwares | Leave a comment

Forget The Social Browsers, Just Install Cortex On Chrome

Even though it hasn’t exactly worked out the first few times companies have attempted it, there’s another movement underway to create a social browser. Currently, RockMelt, Mozilla, and Flock are all trying to fuse social elements into the way we all surf the web. And two of those are doing it on top of Chrome (or Chromium), RockMelt and Flock. But each of those may simply be too much. Why not just go to the source and add a thin layer?

That’s exactly what Cortex, a social extension for Chrome, allows you to do. Instead of trying to rework some of the UI elements of the Chrome browser to make room for sharing and/or social elements, Cortex simply adds a sharing overlay to any site you’re on when you click and hold down your mouse button. Using this mechanism, you can share to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or Instapaper (assuming you set up each of those). It’s simple and brilliant.

All you do is click and hold, the Cortex sharing wheel appears. Then you select which service you want to share an article (or image) with. And if you hover over one of those areas for a second, you’ll see an option appear for you to leave a message alongside the share. This will show up as your tweet, Facebook Wall posting, etc.

If you set it up, you can also use this wheel to share directly with certain Facebook friends.

Cortex is the work of two developers, Eric Wolf and Joey Primiani, who have managed to get their extension over 10,000 active users in just a few weeks. Primiani was previously an intern at Google where he helped design the touch interfaces for search on mobile and tablet devices. That work is clearly paying off here, and Cortex brings a touch-like approach to Chrome on the desktop.

And it’s easy to imagine a sharing mechanism like this eventually being implemented on touch devices as well.

The key to Cortex is simplicity and speed. You just hold down the mouse button and you can share. The extension picks the best title and image for you automatically. And based on my tests, it’s really good at that. There’s no need to click multiple times to share something, it’s click once, drag, and go. You can share something in 2 or 3 seconds.

I’ve written previously about the speed of sharing, and how important it is. Cortex takes it to the next level.

Find the extension here, and learn more in the video below.

How to transfer files from PC to iPhone, copy iPhone to PC?

Here is the detailed tutorial for iJoysoft iPhone Transfer Ultimate. It is perfect iPhone Manager which assists you to transfer files between iPhone and computer, transfer files from PC to iPhone, transfer iPhone songs, copy iPhone to PC, iPhone Transfer files to iTunes library, transfer DVD movies to iPhone directly and transfer other video files with different formats like AVI, MPEG, WMV, MKV, TS, FLV, etc from computer to iPhone.iphone music transfer

In reality, this user manual will be put into several parts:

Part 1: Import supported media files to iPhone
Part 2: Transfer iPhone songs to PC, copy iPhone files to PC
Part 3: Transfer iPhone files to iTunes library directly
Part 4: Copy DVD movies to iPhone/iTunes directly
Part 5: Transfer incompatible media files with various formats to iPhone/iTunes

First, free download this software, install and run iJoysoft iPhone Transfer Ultimate, the professional iPhone Manager. Then, connect your iPhone to computer. After that, your devices will be recognized automatically and its information will be shown on the interface.

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Part 1: Import supported media files to iPhone

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Step 1: Open the library/playlist that you would like to import.

Step 2: Click the “Add File(s) to Device” drop-down button on the bottom, select the “Add File(s) to List” option, and choose the files you need in the dialog that opens, then import them to your iPhone, or select the “Add Folder to List” option to locate the folder you need and import every files from the folder to the list.

Tips:
Additionally, you can right click the library/playlist, and select “Add File(s) to List” or “Add Folder to List” option to import the files you wish to add.

Part 2: Transfer iPhone songs to PC, copy iPhone files to PC

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Step 1: Open a library/playlist, and check the files you plan to export.

Step 2: Click “Export Checked Files to Local Folder” drop-down button, and then choose “Export to Local” option, next select the folder for saving the checked files in the dialog.

Part 3: Transfer iPhone files to iTunes library directly

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Step 1: Open a library/playlist, and check the files you want to export.

Step 2: Click “Export Checked Files to iTunes” button. After that, iTunes opens and the software begins to transfer your appointed files to iTunes.

Part 4: Copy DVD movies to iPhone/iTunes directly

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Step 1: Insert a DVD movie disc you plan to copy.

Step 2: Select the DVD/CD node in the left tree, and click “Open DVD” drop-down button on the bottom, after that select the inserted DVD disc from the drop-down list, or choose a DVD folder, ISO file or IFO file on local disk, then load them into the list.

Tip:
Additionally you can right click the DVD/CD node in the left tree, click “Open DVD” and select the inserted DVD disc, or click “Open DVD > Other Folder” to choose a DVD folder, or click “Open ISO Files…” or “Open IFO Files…” to load the ISO or IFO files you need to import.

Step 3: Check the files you would like to import in the list, and click “Export Checked Files to Device” or “Export Checked Files to iTunes” button to copy them to your iPhone or iTunes library.

Tip:
In case you didn’t connect any device, when you click the “Export Checked Files to Device” button, you will be reminded that that no device is connected. Click “Yes” to keep ripping DVD movie and save the converted media files in the Video/Audio node for later operation, and then click “No” to cancel importing DVD movie.

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Part 5: Transfer incompatible media files with various formats to iPhone/iTunes

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Step 1: Click the Video/Audio node in the left tree.

Step 2: Click the “Add File(s) to Device” drop-down button on the bottom, choose the “Add File(s) to List…” option, and select the files you want in the dialog that opens to add them to the list. Or choose the “Add Folder to List…” option to locate the folder you want and import all the files in the folder to the list.

Tip:
You can also right click the Video/Audio node, and choose “Add File(s) to List…” or “Add Folder to List…” option to add the files you want.

Step 3: Check the files you want in the list, and click “Export Checked Files to Device” or “Export Checked Files to iTunes” button to copy the files into your iPhone or iTunes library.

Tip: If you didn’t connect any device, then the application will prompt you that no device is connected. Click “Yes” to continue converting the files and save the converted media files in the Video/Audio node for later operation, and click “No” to cancel adding the files.

In conclusion, iJoysoft iPhone Transfer Ultimate is the excellent iPhone manager to synchronize your iPhone with your computer, transfer from PC to iPhone, transfer iPhone songs, copy all iPhone files to PC more easily and expediently than iTunes. Besides file synchronization, you can even manage your iPhone as a portable hard disk after you have iJoysoft iPhone Transfer Ultimate installed on your computer.transfer pc to iphone


[via xSellize]

December 1, 2010 Posted by | Applications, How to, iPhone, Microsoft Windows | Leave a comment

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows Computer [Step By Step]

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows ComputerI’ve got a Mac laptop and a Windows desktop, and my Windows desktop has a mighty large hard drive begging to be used for my Time Machine backups. Here’s how to set it up.

Note: I owe most of the important steps for this process (the Terminal commands) to this blog post from 2008.

This process should work on Linux, as well, but I’ll focus on the Windows side of the coin.

Step One: Create a Shared Folder on Your Windows Network and Connect to It from Your Mac

One nice thing about offloading your Time Machine backups to your Windows computer is that it doesn’t need a dedicated drive at all; you just need a folder that you can mount from your Mac.

First, make sure you have sharing turned on on your Windows machine (search "advanced sharing settings" in the Windows Start menu), and make sure the folder you want to use is as your backup is shared. On my Windows computer, the shared folder is at E:\Time Machine.

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows ComputerOnce it’s created, you need to mount the folder from your Mac. To do this, open Finder, type Cmd+K, and enter the smb:// address to your Windows shared folder. On my system, that address looks like this:

smb://Windows/Media/TimeMachine

Windows is the name of my Windows machine on the network, Media is the name of the E:\ drive, and Time Machine is, of course, the name of my folder. You’ll need to enter in your username and password for your Windows machine; make sure you save those to your keychain.

Step Two: Enable Backing Up Time Machine to Unsupported Network Volumes

By default, Time Machine won’t write backups to just any network volume. (It prefers you but a Time Capsule from Apple, I suppose.) Luckily this is easy to get around. You can either fire up Terminal (/Applications/Utilities/Terminal.app), paste the following command and hit Enter:

defaults write com.apple.systempreferences TMShowUnsupportedNetworkVolumes 1

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows Computer…or, if you’ve installed the very cool Secrets preference pane, you can just fire it up, find the Time Machine section, and tick the checkbox next to Show unsupported network volumes in Time Machine.

Step Three: Create Your Dummy Backup File

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows ComputerJust to make sure everything’s working as it should to this point, open Time Machine in your System Preferences and click the Select Backup Disk button. If you’ve mounted your Windows Time Machine folder, it should now show up in the list of potential backup disks. Select it, and click Use for Backup.

Now try backing up to your Windows machine (select Back Up Now from Time Machine in your menu bar). If the backup fails at this point, don’t worry—we’re expecting that. You need to create a backup file (it’s a sparse bundle) first, which will require a little more Terminal work. So fire up Terminal, and paste the following line with a few edits customized to your setup:

hdiutil create -size 125g -fs HFS+J -volname "TimeMachine" ComputerName_MACADDRESS.sparsebundle

NOTE: Don’t paste that without editing it.

The first thing you want to customize is the number 125g—that’s 125GB, which is my preferred size for my Time Machine backup. Pick your preferred Time Machine backup size.

Next, you can customize the text after -volname to whatever you want. I’ve called it TimeMachine.

Last, you have to customize the sparsebundle name, which consists of your Mac’s name (mine’s Air), an underscore, and your Mac’s MAC address (minus the colons). To get your computer’s name, paste this command into Terminal:

scutil --get ComputerName

To get your MAC address, paste the following into Terminal:

ifconfig en0 | grep ether

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows ComputerStrip all the colons from the MAC address, add them to the end of your computer name (separated by an underscore), and then enter your customized command into Terminal. When it’s done, you’ll have a file (in your Home directory if that’s where you’re running the Terminal commands from) named ComputerName_MACADDRESS.sparsebundle.

You’re almost done.

Step Four: Copy Your Time Machine Backup File to Your Windows Machine

Now you’ve just got to run one more Terminal command to finish up. Again, you’ll want to customize this to fit your setup.

cp -R ComputerName_MACADDRESS.sparsebundle /Volumes/TimeMachine

The sparsebundle file should have the same name as the sparsebundle file you created above, and the Volume name should be whatever you mounted your shared Windows folder as (remember, mine’s called TimeMachine, so it’s Volumes/TimeMachine.

Once you’ve customized that command, enter it into Terminal and hit Enter. It will likely take a few minutes for the file to continue copying to your Windows machine, but once it has, you’re ready to back up! Select Back Up Now from the Time Machine drop-down in your menu bar, and if the setup went as planned, your machine should successfully make its first Time Machine backup over your network and to your Windows machine.

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows Computer
Now whenever Time Machine runs its backups, it’ll look for and automatically mount your Windows share, run the backup, and disconnect from the share. If you aren’t on your home network, the backup will simply delay until you are.

[via lifehacker]

November 11, 2010 Posted by | How to, Microsoft Windows, Others | 1 Comment

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows Computer [Step By Step]

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows ComputerI’ve got a Mac laptop and a Windows desktop, and my Windows desktop has a mighty large hard drive begging to be used for my Time Machine backups. Here’s how to set it up.

Note: I owe most of the important steps for this process (the Terminal commands) to this blog post from 2008.

This process should work on Linux, as well, but I’ll focus on the Windows side of the coin.

Step One: Create a Shared Folder on Your Windows Network and Connect to It from Your Mac

One nice thing about offloading your Time Machine backups to your Windows computer is that it doesn’t need a dedicated drive at all; you just need a folder that you can mount from your Mac.

First, make sure you have sharing turned on on your Windows machine (search “advanced sharing settings” in the Windows Start menu), and make sure the folder you want to use is as your backup is shared. On my Windows computer, the shared folder is at E:\Time Machine.

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows ComputerOnce it’s created, you need to mount the folder from your Mac. To do this, open Finder, type Cmd+K, and enter the smb:// address to your Windows shared folder. On my system, that address looks like this:

smb://Windows/Media/TimeMachine

Windows is the name of my Windows machine on the network, Media is the name of the E:\ drive, and Time Machine is, of course, the name of my folder. You’ll need to enter in your username and password for your Windows machine; make sure you save those to your keychain.

Step Two: Enable Backing Up Time Machine to Unsupported Network Volumes

By default, Time Machine won’t write backups to just any network volume. (It prefers you but a Time Capsule from Apple, I suppose.) Luckily this is easy to get around. You can either fire up Terminal (/Applications/Utilities/Terminal.app), paste the following command and hit Enter:

defaults write com.apple.systempreferences TMShowUnsupportedNetworkVolumes 1

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows Computer…or, if you’ve installed the very cool Secrets preference pane, you can just fire it up, find the Time Machine section, and tick the checkbox next to Show unsupported network volumes in Time Machine.

Step Three: Create Your Dummy Backup File

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows ComputerJust to make sure everything’s working as it should to this point, open Time Machine in your System Preferences and click the Select Backup Disk button. If you’ve mounted your Windows Time Machine folder, it should now show up in the list of potential backup disks. Select it, and click Use for Backup.

Now try backing up to your Windows machine (select Back Up Now from Time Machine in your menu bar). If the backup fails at this point, don’t worry—we’re expecting that. You need to create a backup file (it’s a sparse bundle) first, which will require a little more Terminal work. So fire up Terminal, and paste the following line with a few edits customized to your setup:

hdiutil create -size 125g -fs HFS+J -volname “TimeMachine” ComputerName_MACADDRESS.sparsebundle

NOTE: Don’t paste that without editing it.

The first thing you want to customize is the number 125g—that’s 125GB, which is my preferred size for my Time Machine backup. Pick your preferred Time Machine backup size.

Next, you can customize the text after -volname to whatever you want. I’ve called it TimeMachine.

Last, you have to customize the sparsebundle name, which consists of your Mac’s name (mine’s Air), an underscore, and your Mac’s MAC address (minus the colons). To get your computer’s name, paste this command into Terminal:

scutil --get ComputerName

To get your MAC address, paste the following into Terminal:

ifconfig en0 | grep ether

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows ComputerStrip all the colons from the MAC address, add them to the end of your computer name (separated by an underscore), and then enter your customized command into Terminal. When it’s done, you’ll have a file (in your Home directory if that’s where you’re running the Terminal commands from) named ComputerName_MACADDRESS.sparsebundle.

You’re almost done.

Step Four: Copy Your Time Machine Backup File to Your Windows Machine

Now you’ve just got to run one more Terminal command to finish up. Again, you’ll want to customize this to fit your setup.

cp -R ComputerName_MACADDRESS.sparsebundle /Volumes/TimeMachine

The sparsebundle file should have the same name as the sparsebundle file you created above, and the Volume name should be whatever you mounted your shared Windows folder as (remember, mine’s called TimeMachine, so it’s Volumes/TimeMachine.

Once you’ve customized that command, enter it into Terminal and hit Enter. It will likely take a few minutes for the file to continue copying to your Windows machine, but once it has, you’re ready to back up! Select Back Up Now from the Time Machine drop-down in your menu bar, and if the setup went as planned, your machine should successfully make its first Time Machine backup over your network and to your Windows machine.

How to Set Up Time Machine to Back Up to a Networked Windows Computer
Now whenever Time Machine runs its backups, it’ll look for and automatically mount your Windows share, run the backup, and disconnect from the share. If you aren’t on your home network, the backup will simply delay until you are.

[via lifehacker]

November 11, 2010 Posted by | How to, Microsoft Windows, Others | Leave a comment

PhotoSync for Lazy Auto-Syncs Your Photos to Your iPhone Over Wi-Fi [Downloads]

PhotoSync for Lazy Auto-Syncs Your Photos to Your iPhone Over Wi-Fi iOS and Windows-only: PhotoSync for Lazy is a desktop and iOS app combination that watches a folder on your Windows PC and syncs any photos inside of it to your iPhone automatically.

Syncing photos to an iOS device is kind of a pain. iTunes goes through an obnoxiously long, CPU-intensive process of converting all your pictures to a friendly size and format that the iPhone will like. Additionally, you have to plug in your iPhone and wait for the entire sync process (including backup) to take place. If you just want to get your freakin’ photos on your iPhone, easily, with minimal effort, PhotoSync for Lazy is designed for just that purpose.

PhotoSync for Lazy Auto-Syncs Your Photos to Your iPhone Over Wi-Fi

It comes in two versions for your iOS device, free and paid ($3). The paid version has no limitations and the free version limits you to 50 photos, but it’s a good way to test out the software to see if you like it. You’ll also need to download this Windows app (direct download link) so it can watch a sync folder on your Windows PC.

PhotoSync for Lazy Auto-Syncs Your Photos to Your iPhone Over Wi-Fi

While there’s no real configuration involved, PhotoSync for Lazy requires your PC and iOS device are on the same local network so it won’t work if you separate the two. Aside from that, the only thing you really need to do is put photos in the watched folder and open PhotoSync for Lazy on your iOS device. From there, PhotoSync for Lazy will start loading the folders onto your device exactly as they’re organized on your PC.

PhotoSync for Lazy is available right now for Windows and iOS. It costs $3 if you’ve got more than 50 photos to synchronize, otherwise you’ll do just fine with the free version.

PhotoSync for Lazy [via AddictiveTips]

October 22, 2010 Posted by | Applications, iPhone, Microsoft Windows | Leave a comment

PhotoSync for Lazy Auto-Syncs Your Photos to Your iPhone Over Wi-Fi [Downloads]

PhotoSync for Lazy Auto-Syncs Your Photos to Your iPhone Over Wi-Fi iOS and Windows-only: PhotoSync for Lazy is a desktop and iOS app combination that watches a folder on your Windows PC and syncs any photos inside of it to your iPhone automatically.

Syncing photos to an iOS device is kind of a pain. iTunes goes through an obnoxiously long, CPU-intensive process of converting all your pictures to a friendly size and format that the iPhone will like. Additionally, you have to plug in your iPhone and wait for the entire sync process (including backup) to take place. If you just want to get your freakin’ photos on your iPhone, easily, with minimal effort, PhotoSync for Lazy is designed for just that purpose.

PhotoSync for Lazy Auto-Syncs Your Photos to Your iPhone Over Wi-Fi

It comes in two versions for your iOS device, free and paid ($3). The paid version has no limitations and the free version limits you to 50 photos, but it’s a good way to test out the software to see if you like it. You’ll also need to download this Windows app (direct download link) so it can watch a sync folder on your Windows PC.

PhotoSync for Lazy Auto-Syncs Your Photos to Your iPhone Over Wi-Fi

While there’s no real configuration involved, PhotoSync for Lazy requires your PC and iOS device are on the same local network so it won’t work if you separate the two. Aside from that, the only thing you really need to do is put photos in the watched folder and open PhotoSync for Lazy on your iOS device. From there, PhotoSync for Lazy will start loading the folders onto your device exactly as they’re organized on your PC.

PhotoSync for Lazy is available right now for Windows and iOS. It costs $3 if you’ve got more than 50 photos to synchronize, otherwise you’ll do just fine with the free version.

PhotoSync for Lazy [via AddictiveTips]

October 22, 2010 Posted by | Applications, iPhone, Microsoft Windows | Leave a comment

A cute hamster help you convert videos to iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad (Windows Only) [Video]

Windows: If you're looking for a simple drag and drop solution for converting videos for on your iPod, PS3, or other portable device or media center, Hamster Free Video Converter is a no-fuss video conversion tool.

Hamster Free Video Converter converts from and to 3GP, MP4, AVI, MPG, WMV, FLV, and more. You can keep things as simple as dragging, dropping, and converting your files or you can tinker in the settings to customize the conversion just the way you want. The easy-start wizard makes it painless for even a person with no prior video conversion experience to convert their video collection�Hamster Free Video Converter has presents for over two hundred devices.

Hamster Free Video Converter is freeware, Windows only. Check out our Hive Five on Best Media Converters for more video conversion tools.

Hamster [via MakeUseOf]


October 20, 2010 Posted by | Applications, Free apps, Microsoft Windows | Leave a comment

A cute hamster help you convert videos to iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad (Windows Only) [Video]

Windows: If you’re looking for a simple drag and drop solution for converting videos for on your iPod, PS3, or other portable device or media center, Hamster Free Video Converter is a no-fuss video conversion tool.

Hamster Free Video Converter converts from and to 3GP, MP4, AVI, MPG, WMV, FLV, and more. You can keep things as simple as dragging, dropping, and converting your files or you can tinker in the settings to customize the conversion just the way you want. The easy-start wizard makes it painless for even a person with no prior video conversion experience to convert their video collection—Hamster Free Video Converter has presents for over two hundred devices.

Hamster Free Video Converter is freeware, Windows only. Check out our Hive Five on Best Media Converters for more video conversion tools.

Hamster [via MakeUseOf]

October 20, 2010 Posted by | Applications, Free apps, Microsoft Windows | Leave a comment

Make you photos and movies with amazing effect, free for limited time, get it now : Fluid FX (Entertainment)


Fluid FX 1.1.1

Category: Entertainment
Price: $.99 -> Free, Version: 1.1.1 (iTunes)

Description:

*** 50% off for a limited time! ***

Special Effects Fun at Your Fingertips!

* APPOLICIOUS RATING: 5 out of 5 bars! *

Autodesk® Fluid FX brings the fun and excitement of Hollywood visual effects to your iPad, iPod Touch and iPhone. Powered by the Academy Award®-winning fluid dynamics technology from Autodesk® Maya, Fluid FX puts you in control of a real-time simulation using up to 10 multi-touch points. Shoot fire from your finger tips. Create ultra-realistic smoke that floats, falls, and flows with gravity. Warp, swirl, and ignite photos from your image library. Create amazing and hilarious warped pictures and save them to your photo library or experiment with realtime smoke and fire to create awesome imagery.

** Requires iOS 3.2 or Above **

?Academy Award® – winning effects � Fire, Smoke and Fluid effects from Autodesk® Maya
?Photo warping �Apply effects to photos and images from your Photo Library
?Fully customizable � Play with a variety of characteristics, including color, density and gravity
?Unlimited presets � Create, save, and load an unlimited number of your own presets
?Video output support � (iPad) Using the Dock connector to VGA or Component cables, project onto any external diplay
?Universal App � buy once and install on all your iOS devices (iPad, iPhone & iPod Touch)

What's New

? Fluid Effects 1.1.1 Enhancements:

� Updated behavior of image import scale and positioning dialog

� Minor Bug Fixes

1.1.1 Also includes all the new features from 1.1 listed below:

——————————–
? Fluid Effects 1.1 Update
——————————–

? Enhanced User Interface

� Introducing the Mixer
� Select Images and Effects independently. This allows you to try a variety of effects on a single image or to try many different images with a single effect.
� Simple one button import of photos from your photo library directly into the Mixer photo list
� New controls at the top of the simulation area allow you to quickly cycle through images and effects when in full screen mode
� New AutoPilot Mode allows you to automate Fluid FX. Perfect for use as kinetic digital art when used with a dock. With AutoPilot Fluid FX can draw random patterns and cycle through images and effects while you watch. You can join in at anytime or just sit back and enjoy the show.
� Simplified effect creation workflow through the Mixer
� It is now possible to Pan and zoom images during import
� New general settings for resetting to factory defaults and turning on hiding control bar
� New preset Warp effects added
� Added new default gradient & moire backgrounds

? Enhancements for iOS 4.1 and above:

� Video Recording!

� With iOS 4.1 and above you can now record your simulation in realtime and save it directly to your Photo Library for upload to YouTube or emailing to friends! Animate and warp your friends faces and send them your creations!

� Devices running iOS 4.1+ will reveal a new video button on the control bar. Tapping this button starts video recording. Tap it again to stop. Your movie is saved to your Photo Library automatically.

Note: You may notice a decrease in interactive performance during recording. This lag will not be present in your recorded movie.

Fluid FX

Price Drop: Fluid FX (Entertainment)


October 19, 2010 Posted by | Applications, Free apps, Microsoft Windows | Leave a comment

Parallels Mobile App Brings Windows To Your iOS Device [Apps]

"Parallels

Parallels users, listen up! To accompany the recently-released Parallels Desktop 6 for Mac, the Parallels peeps have released Parallels Mobile, a free app that lets users poke around on their Windows machines right on their iPhones and iPads.

""

As you can see in the demo video, and as you'd expect, there's a little bit of lag involved, but otherwise you can start, stop, and access all the virtual machines you've set up through Parallels Desktop right from your iOS device. That means printing things to connected printers, checking what's up in Outlook, and, yes, seeing all those lovely Flash elements on all your favorite websites. Just don't expect them to be that snappy. The app is free, so if you're a frequent Parallels user it's definitely worth a look. [iTunes]

[via <a href="http://ping.fm/bqdZt


September 15, 2010 Posted by | Applications, Microsoft Windows, News | Leave a comment

Parallels Mobile App Brings Windows To Your iOS Device [Apps]

Parallels Mobile App Brings Windows To Your iOS Device

Parallels users, listen up! To accompany the recently-released Parallels Desktop 6 for Mac, the Parallels peeps have released Parallels Mobile, a free app that lets users poke around on their Windows machines right on their iPhones and iPads.

As you can see in the demo video, and as you’d expect, there’s a little bit of lag involved, but otherwise you can start, stop, and access all the virtual machines you’ve set up through Parallels Desktop right from your iOS device. That means printing things to connected printers, checking what’s up in Outlook, and, yes, seeing all those lovely Flash elements on all your favorite websites. Just don’t expect them to be that snappy. The app is free, so if you’re a frequent Parallels user it’s definitely worth a look. [iTunes]

[via Gizmodo]

September 15, 2010 Posted by | Applications, iPad, iPhone, Microsoft Windows, News | Leave a comment

Stream All Your Music, Photos, and Videos From Your Laptop To Your iPhone With Libox

src=http://ping.fm/7Vk1J

The more computers you have mobile, laptop, desktop, the bigger hassle it becomes to get your media when you want it, on the device you want it. Apple deals with this by making you constantly sync your iPhone with your laptop. It involves cables and transferring files. Microsofts answer to effortless sync is Mesh, but that is still in beta after two years and is Windows-only. An Israeli startup called Libox thinks it has a better way and it is available right now on your desktop, on the Web, and on the iPhone.

Libox is a peer-to-peer application that scans all the media on your primary computer photos, videos, music and then streams it to other devices with a Libox app or browser. The iPhone app just went live in iTunes a few hours ago. You can see all your photos, and play all your videos, and even listen to your entire music collection. It is all streamed from your laptop, which acts as a server.

src=http://ping.fm/2RCrE

It does require some set-up. First, you must download the desktop app from Libox, which scans your computer for all your media photos, videos, music. This can take a while, and of you have a lot of media as in thousands of photos and songs, it might take a few tries before you the scan gets everything. This part is still a bit buggy.

But once you scan your computer, all of your photos, videos, and music is available from any computer with a browser, and now on your iPhone via the new app. It works exactly the same on the mobile Web in both iPhone and Android browsers. Whenever you add more media to your computer, it is automatically available everywhere else without any cables. Libox transcodes the files into formats that can be streamed to whatever device you are on. The catch is that your host computer must be on the Libox app works in the background. Eventually, Libox will supplement this by making the media you access the most often available via the cloud as well.

Because of the way the iPhone works, media that you create on your phone such as photos or videos still have to be manually synced to your computer before they can then be made available again via Libox. With the Android app, which is in the works, it will just sync wirelessly via WiFi. For mobile phones with relatively limited memory, you can offload your videos and photos, but still be able to see them on the phone.

src=http://ping.fm/yTRDx

Being able to get to your own stuff is very useful, as long as your keep your main computer on. But you can also share your media with other Libox users. For the most part, this does not present an issue with photos or personal videos, but with music or Hollywood content that could raise the attention of the copyright enforcers. However, Libox is not really designed for mass sharing, so it might not be a problem.

A bigger risk for Libox is that Apple, Google, and Microsoft will end up doing the same thing and baking it directly into their products. It is time to get rid of those syncing cables and they know it. Until then, though, there is Libox.

The companys founder is Erez Pilosof, who also founded Walla, the Israeli equivalent of Yahoo He has raised only $2 million in seed funding from Evergreen Venture Partners and Rhodium.


August 25, 2010 Posted by | Applications, Free apps, iPad, iPhone, Microsoft Windows | Leave a comment

Stream All Your Music, Photos, and Videos From Your Laptop To Your iPhone With Libox

The more computers you have (mobile, laptop, desktop), the bigger hassle it becomes to get your media when you want it, on the device you want it. Apple deals with this by making you constantly sync your iPhone with your laptop. It involves cables and transferring files. Microsoft’s answer to effortless sync is Mesh, but that is still in beta after two years and is Windows-only. An Israeli startup called Libox thinks it has a better way and it is available right now on your desktop, on the Web, and on the iPhone.

Libox is a peer-to-peer application that scans all the media on your primary computer (photos, videos, music) and then streams it to other devices with a Libox app or browser. The iPhone app just went live in iTunes a few hours ago. You can see all your photos, and play all your videos, and even listen to your entire music collection. It is all streamed from your laptop, which acts as a server.

It does require some set-up. First, you must download the desktop app from Libox, which scans your computer for all your media (photos, videos, music). This can take a while, and of you have a lot of media (as in thousands of photos and songs), it might take a few tries before you the scan gets everything. This part is still a bit buggy.

But once you scan your computer, all of your photos, videos, and music is available from any computer with a browser, and now on your iPhone via the new app. It works exactly the same on the mobile Web in both iPhone and Android browsers. Whenever you add more media to your computer, it is automatically available everywhere else without any cables. Libox transcodes the files into formats that can be streamed to whatever device you are on. The catch is that your host computer must be on (the Libox app works in the background). Eventually, Libox will supplement this by making the media you access the most often available via the cloud as well.

Because of the way the iPhone works, media that you create on your phone such as photos or videos still have to be manually synced to your computer before they can then be made available again via Libox. With the Android app, which is in the works, it will just sync wirelessly via WiFi. For mobile phones with relatively limited memory, you can offload your videos and photos, but still be able to see them on the phone.

Being able to get to your own stuff is very useful, as long as your keep your main computer on. But you can also share your media with other Libox users. For the most part, this does not present an issue with photos or personal videos, but with music or Hollywood content that could raise the attention of the copyright enforcers. However, Libox is not really designed for mass sharing, so it might not be a problem.

A bigger risk for Libox is that Apple, Google, and Microsoft will end up doing the same thing and baking it directly into their products. It is time to get rid of those syncing cables and they know it. Until then, though, there is Libox.

The company’s founder is Erez Pilosof, who also founded Walla!, the Israeli equivalent of Yahoo! He has raised only $2 million in seed funding from Evergreen Venture Partners and Rhodium.

Snow Transformation Pack Makes Your Windows Desktop Look Like Mac OS X [Downloads]

Snow Transformation Pack Makes Your Windows Desktop Look Like Mac OS XWindows: If you like the look and feel of Mac OS X but prefer to stick with Windows (whether it be for gaming, or because you just don’t like Apple), freeware Snow Transformation Pack will make Windows looks like OS X.

Click on the image for a closer look.

Snow Transformation Pack will change the appearance of your whole system, including the login screen, icons, wallpapers, sounds, dock, dialog boxes, and other UI elements. You’ll need to disable User Account Control to install it, so you may have to run the installer twice—once to disable UAC and then again (after restarting) to install the package. On installing, you’ll get a few choices as to whether you want to install a few extra background apps that add extra graphics, which is nice if your computer isn’t necessarily a powerhouse (so you can turn them off to keep performance up).

It looks surprisingly like OS X, with a few exceptions in usability. There are a few manual tweaks you can make to make even look more Mac-like (such right clicking on the Taskbar, hitting Properties, and checking “Use Small Icons” in the Taskbar tab), but overall it looks pretty good. If you’re tired of the usual Windows GUI and want to get a Mac-like experience for a while, it’s a neat and easy tool to help you do so.

Snow Transformation Pack is a free download, Windows Vista/7 only.

Snow Transformation Pack [via Life Rocks 2.0]

 

August 16, 2010 Posted by | Applications, Free apps, Microsoft Windows | Leave a comment

Snow Transformation Pack Makes Your Windows Desktop Look Like Mac OS X [Downloads]

Snow Transformation Pack Makes Your Windows Desktop Look Like Mac OS XWindows: If you like the look and feel of Mac OS X but prefer to stick with Windows (whether it be for gaming, or because you just don’t like Apple), freeware Snow Transformation Pack will make Windows looks like OS X.

Click on the image for a closer look.

Snow Transformation Pack will change the appearance of your whole system, including the login screen, icons, wallpapers, sounds, dock, dialog boxes, and other UI elements. You’ll need to disable User Account Control to install it, so you may have to run the installer twice—once to disable UAC and then again (after restarting) to install the package. On installing, you’ll get a few choices as to whether you want to install a few extra background apps that add extra graphics, which is nice if your computer isn’t necessarily a powerhouse (so you can turn them off to keep performance up).

It looks surprisingly like OS X, with a few exceptions in usability. There are a few manual tweaks you can make to make even look more Mac-like (such right clicking on the Taskbar, hitting Properties, and checking “Use Small Icons” in the Taskbar tab), but overall it looks pretty good. If you’re tired of the usual Windows GUI and want to get a Mac-like experience for a while, it’s a neat and easy tool to help you do so.

Snow Transformation Pack is a free download, Windows Vista/7 only.

Snow Transformation Pack [via Life Rocks 2.0]

 

August 16, 2010 Posted by | Applications, Free apps, Microsoft Windows | Leave a comment

GooReader Brings Google Books to Your Windows Desktop [Downloads]

Windows: GooReader is a desktop application for Google Books that allows you to search, read, and even download the books and magazines you find.

The web-based interface for Google Books is functional, if a bit spartan, but GooReader offers a polished interface. You’ll get a better look at the covers, a book-like page turning experience instead of vertical scrolling, and easy to use search.

In addition to enhancing the display and search functions of Google Books the premium version ($20) also supports saving and PDF creation—only documents available for download, GooReader won’t download protected documents. Check out the video above to see GooReader in action. GooReader is Windows ony and requires .Net 3.5 or above.

GooReader [via DownloadSquad]

 

[via lifehacker]

August 13, 2010 Posted by | Applications, Google, Microsoft Windows | Leave a comment

GooReader Brings Google Books to Your Windows Desktop [Downloads]

Windows: GooReader is a desktop application for Google Books that allows you to search, read, and even download the books and magazines you find.

The web-based interface for Google Books is functional, if a bit spartan, but GooReader offers a polished interface. You’ll get a better look at the covers, a book-like page turning experience instead of vertical scrolling, and easy to use search.

In addition to enhancing the display and search functions of Google Books the premium version ($20) also supports saving and PDF creation—only documents available for download, GooReader won’t download protected documents. Check out the video above to see GooReader in action. GooReader is Windows ony and requires .Net 3.5 or above.

GooReader [via DownloadSquad]

 

[via lifehacker]

August 13, 2010 Posted by | Applications, Google, Microsoft Windows | 1 Comment

Restore data from your broken iPhone 2G, 3G, 3GS with Reincubate (Mac / Windows / Linux)

A little while ago we received the following question in our iPhone help / support section….

A reader asked us how he could restore data from his water-damaged iPhone 3G.

After looking into the problem we came up with the perfect solution for owners of iPhone 2G / iPhone 3G / iPhone 3GS devices.

If you have a damaged / broken iPhone and you’d like to get your data out of it it, such as SMS’es, contacts, photos and more, all you need to have is a recent iTunes backup of your phone.

Posted Image

Then you simply run the program Reincubate on your iPhone’s iTunes backup file, and extract the data out of it.

Afterwards you will be able to restore your files by various ways, whether it’s importing your contacts into your Outlook program and syncing it to your iPhone, or simply re-uploading the lost images.

To download the free version of Reincubate backup extractor for iPhone proceed to http://www.reincubate.com .

It’s available for Windows, Mac and Linux powered computers.

[via iphoneworld]


restore data from your broken iPhone 2G, 3G, 3GS with Reincubate (Mac / Windows / Linux)

August 1, 2010 Posted by | Applications, Microsoft Windows, Others | 2 Comments

Professional iPhone Transfer User Guide

Now more and more people own iPhone including iPhone, iPhone 3G, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4.

Some want to backup iPhone files to computer, some want to add music to iPhone, others want to transfer files between iPhone and iPod.

This article will show you how to transfer files from iPhone to computer, from pc to iPhone, from iPhone to iPod/iPhone.

You should use a professional iPhone Transfer, you can free download such iPhone Transfer.

Posted Image

Part 1: Copy your iPod/iPhone files to your computer.

Step 1: Run the software, and connect your iPod/iPhone to your computer via USB cable. After done, the iPod/iPhone icon and its library and playlists will appear in the Device list.

Step 2: Open the library/playlist that you want to export files, and then check the file(s) you want to export in the file list.

Step 3: Click Posted Image iPhone to PC to select the destination of the exporting files and start exporting files.
Otherwise, you could also choose the Export to local option from the Actions menu, and then export the files from your iPod/iPhone to actual device.

Tip: Click Posted Image Track Filter to use “Track Filter” function to help you quickly browse your library by genre, artist and album.

Part 2: Transfer files from one iPod/iPhone to another iPod/iPhone.

Step 1: Run the software, and connect two iPod/iPhone to your computer via USB cable.

Step 2: Open the library/playlist that you want to export files. Pick the files that you need to transfer.

Step 3: Click Posted Image it will show you the folder of another iPod that you want to transfer to. Click OK. The transfer can be finished automatically.

Part 3: Copy video and audio files or folders from Computer to iPhone.

Step 1: Run the software, and connect your iPod/iPhone to your computer via USB cable.

Step 2: Click Posted Image PC to iPhone to seek the files or folders that you want to import to iPod and click OK.
The process of importing will be finished instantly.

More iPod/iPhone Tools:
iPod to Mac Transfer | iPhone Transfer |iPhone SMS Transfer | iPod Transfer software | iPhone Ringtone Maker for Mac

Professional iPhone Transfer User Guide

[via xSellize]

July 14, 2010 Posted by | Applications, Microsoft Windows, Others | 3 Comments

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